Examples of Content Marketing by banks and credit unions


There are some great examples of banks and credit unions that actively conduct a Content Marketing approach. I’ve chosen two for this post but we’ll continue to highlight the best in the industry on our blog.
Example #1: Affinity Federal Credit Union in Basking Ridge, NJ

AffinityWhen you visit Affinity Federal Credit Union’s website you are exposed to five main navigation choices – Personal, Business, Loans, Advice & Planning, About Us. My guess is four out five of those options are on just about every bank or credit union’s site. The one that’s not – Advice & Planning.
Affinity Examples of Content Marketing by banks and credit unions
By making this a key area of their website, Affinity is building themselves as the “advice & planning” experts. If you go into this section you’ll find a wide range of topics that cover most of the services their credit union provides. You can find offers to download “Quick Guides” (downloadable PDF files) or to contact professionals who can help further.
Example #2: Nevada State Bank in Las Vegas, NV

Jeffrey Pilcher of The Financial Brand turned us on to the Nevada State Bank, who created an online content marketing strategy with their “Economic Forecast” section of their site. The site includes a number of online video presentations that include professionals such as the CEO of Contango Advisors talking about the economic turbulence and what this means to individual investors. They also have invitations to upcoming presentations that you can sign up for. Online video is a great content marketing strategy. There’s a reason YouTube is the world’s second largest search engine.
Nevada State Bank Examples of Content Marketing by banks and credit unions
Nevada State Bank made a decision to focus on a certain type of client; savvy investors. They clearly went out of their way to make sure the production value of each video was high given the targeted audience. But the great thing about content marketing today is the costs are much less then what it use to be when there were only a few companies that dominated the way consumers received their information.